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YTWL’s for Shoulder Mobility, Strengthening, and Injury Prevention
Out of all injuries that occur during strength training, one of the most common ones include shoulder injuries. I’m sure many of you have already experienced this in some form or another. Whether it be a chronic condition, or an acute injury; it is always detrimental towards anyone trying to reach their goals.
More often than not however, most people don’t take the time to properly warm up their shoulders. I’m not talking about static stretches and folding out your arm across your chest for a set count. I’m talking about prehab and mobility exercises that can not only aid in preventing injury, but also strengthen the shoulder joint.
To explain why the shoulder is more susceptible to injury than other joints, the shoulder joint has far more mobility than other joint which in turns sacrifices stability to be able to withstand as much as other joints.. That coupled with improper form such as benching with the elbows flared out, can make for an injury to easily occur but that’s a whole other article.
Some great prehab exercises that are also used by clients in rehabilitation from shoulder injuries are a set series called YTWL’s. YTWL’s earn their name from the motion that the arms make when in extension. They aid in improving shoulder stability and strengthening of the rotator cuffs. They also improve scapular strength and muscle recruitment patterns. 
They are fairly easy to perform and they can be done before any upper body movement, especially when benching and doing shoulder presses. The attached picture show what the end movement looks like for each exercise and each one can be done for repetitions of 10 -15 with importance to contracting at the extension. 
Other variations include doing these movements with a TRX which provide a further challenge and may be performed after a workout to prevent fatiguing the shoulder stabilizers which could also lead to possible injury.
I’ll include some further exercises to more specifically strengthen the shoulder stabilizers and rotator cuffs which can be added after a workout in another article. Until then, make sure to warm up properly and don’t be that person doing everything they can after it’s too late.

YTWL’s for Shoulder Mobility, Strengthening, and Injury Prevention

Out of all injuries that occur during strength training, one of the most common ones include shoulder injuries. I’m sure many of you have already experienced this in some form or another. Whether it be a chronic condition, or an acute injury; it is always detrimental towards anyone trying to reach their goals.

More often than not however, most people don’t take the time to properly warm up their shoulders. I’m not talking about static stretches and folding out your arm across your chest for a set count. I’m talking about prehab and mobility exercises that can not only aid in preventing injury, but also strengthen the shoulder joint.

To explain why the shoulder is more susceptible to injury than other joints, the shoulder joint has far more mobility than other joint which in turns sacrifices stability to be able to withstand as much as other joints.. That coupled with improper form such as benching with the elbows flared out, can make for an injury to easily occur but that’s a whole other article.

Some great prehab exercises that are also used by clients in rehabilitation from shoulder injuries are a set series called YTWL’s. YTWL’s earn their name from the motion that the arms make when in extension. They aid in improving shoulder stability and strengthening of the rotator cuffs. They also improve scapular strength and muscle recruitment patterns. 

They are fairly easy to perform and they can be done before any upper body movement, especially when benching and doing shoulder presses. The attached picture show what the end movement looks like for each exercise and each one can be done for repetitions of 10 -15 with importance to contracting at the extension. 

Other variations include doing these movements with a TRX which provide a further challenge and may be performed after a workout to prevent fatiguing the shoulder stabilizers which could also lead to possible injury.

I’ll include some further exercises to more specifically strengthen the shoulder stabilizers and rotator cuffs which can be added after a workout in another article. Until then, make sure to warm up properly and don’t be that person doing everything they can after it’s too late.

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